Remembering the Renaissance

After our short interlude in Milan, we hopped on a train to Florence, the center of the renaissance. This was one of the most beautiful cities to walk around in. If you’re a fan of art, you should not miss this place. Art galleries pretty much everywhere! There were also tons of tourists so be prepared to rub elbows at one of the lines you’re bound to end up in.

Walking down the streets of Firenze
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Cappelle Medici
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Duomo di Firenze – absolutely a must see. Incredible architecture!
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Baptistery – the building was covered in scaffolding when we visited but you could still enter it and see the beautiful domed ceiling
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Palazzo Medici Riccardi – one of the palaces of the Medici family (patrons of the artists)
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Galleria dell’Accademia – home to several of Michelangelo’s works, most notably, David. It would be a good idea to book tickets online so you have a reserved slot. Lines can get very long. The same is true for the Uffizi Gallery which houses some of the best artwork in Florence. We weren’t able to visit this during our trip but just as well since we were getting overloaded with all the art already.
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Basilica di Santa Maria Novella
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Red tiled roofs of Florence from Piazzale di Michelangelo
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Celebrity crypts at Santa Croce Basilica
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Museo Nazionale del Bargello – this is home to some of the best sculptures in the city. Surprisingly, not too many visitors were going around here.
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et tu Brutus
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Michelangelo
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Raphael’s David
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Palazzo Vecchio – former center of government in Florence, converted into an art gallery
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Piazza dela Signoria – plaza in front of Palazzo Vecchio and beside the Uffizi Gallery. Houses some replicas of famous sculptures.
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Beer break!
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